natgeofound:

A solitary fisherman’s home keeps watch on quiet Placentia Bay in Newfoundland, Canada, 1974.Photograph by Sam Abell, National Geographic Creative

publicdesignfestival:

Taking part in Vancouver Biennale, the Brazilian OSGEMEOS has recently created a brand new work of art on six gigantic silos located on Granville Island. 
Photos by: Vancouver Biennale / Sergio Magro Global BC and Roaming-the-Planet. All rights reserved. publicdesignfestival:

Taking part in Vancouver Biennale, the Brazilian OSGEMEOS has recently created a brand new work of art on six gigantic silos located on Granville Island. 
Photos by: Vancouver Biennale / Sergio Magro Global BC and Roaming-the-Planet. All rights reserved. publicdesignfestival:

Taking part in Vancouver Biennale, the Brazilian OSGEMEOS has recently created a brand new work of art on six gigantic silos located on Granville Island. 
Photos by: Vancouver Biennale / Sergio Magro Global BC and Roaming-the-Planet. All rights reserved.

publicdesignfestival:

Taking part in Vancouver Biennale, the Brazilian OSGEMEOS has recently created a brand new work of art on six gigantic silos located on Granville Island.

Photos by: Vancouver Biennale / Sergio Magro Global BC and Roaming-the-Planet. All rights reserved.

nevver:

Time lapse, Panama Canal
thisbigcity:

Bogota’s new bike hire scheme is expanding, and it’s just one of many measure working on creating a more cycle-friendly city, including new bike lanes and car-free plazas. 
We take a look in more detail in our latest post thisbigcity:

Bogota’s new bike hire scheme is expanding, and it’s just one of many measure working on creating a more cycle-friendly city, including new bike lanes and car-free plazas. 
We take a look in more detail in our latest post thisbigcity:

Bogota’s new bike hire scheme is expanding, and it’s just one of many measure working on creating a more cycle-friendly city, including new bike lanes and car-free plazas. 
We take a look in more detail in our latest post

thisbigcity:

Bogota’s new bike hire scheme is expanding, and it’s just one of many measure working on creating a more cycle-friendly city, including new bike lanes and car-free plazas. 

We take a look in more detail in our latest post

heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors

heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors

ClimateWorks is a San Francisco based foundation whose mission is to support public policies that prevent dangerous climate change and promote global prosperity. This infographic about wlkable neighborhoods is part of a document called Planning Cities for People, which was prepared for the Chinese government. The document, which contains 8 research-based recommendations that lead to prosperous, low-carbon urban areas, uses richly illustrated maps and diagrams to present examples of street-grids that promote walking, prioritize bicycle networks, create mixed-use neighborhoods and support high-quality transit.

(via humanscalecities)

urbangeographies:

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA:  Illuminated roadways show the contours of urbanization!

by Marc Khachfe on Flickr.

publicdesignfestival:

In the south of Funen island (Denmark), JDS, URBAN AGENCY and Creo arkitekter have just created the new Faaborg Harbour Bath and Blue Base. The open sea bathing area has four wooden bridges of different width and length where lo sunbathe, sit, relax and dive into the water. publicdesignfestival:

In the south of Funen island (Denmark), JDS, URBAN AGENCY and Creo arkitekter have just created the new Faaborg Harbour Bath and Blue Base. The open sea bathing area has four wooden bridges of different width and length where lo sunbathe, sit, relax and dive into the water. publicdesignfestival:

In the south of Funen island (Denmark), JDS, URBAN AGENCY and Creo arkitekter have just created the new Faaborg Harbour Bath and Blue Base. The open sea bathing area has four wooden bridges of different width and length where lo sunbathe, sit, relax and dive into the water.

publicdesignfestival:

In the south of Funen island (Denmark), JDS, URBAN AGENCY and Creo arkitekter have just created the new Faaborg Harbour Bath and Blue Base. The open sea bathing area has four wooden bridges of different width and length where lo sunbathe, sit, relax and dive into the water.

nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere
nevver:

Monet

Monet
thisbigcity:

Google “cities as an organism” and you’ll find everything from TED talks to blog posts to academic papers on the topic. There’s no shortage of suggestions that collective actions in cities are like an urban metabolism.
The immense amount of data generated in cities can offer us an improved understanding of how everything from water to waste to people to cargo moves around.
Which is exactly what .FABRIC and James Corner Field Operations have done as part of their new show at the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam, which runs until August 23rd.
Find out more about their digital mapping of Rotterdam in our latest post
thisbigcity:

Google “cities as an organism” and you’ll find everything from TED talks to blog posts to academic papers on the topic. There’s no shortage of suggestions that collective actions in cities are like an urban metabolism.
The immense amount of data generated in cities can offer us an improved understanding of how everything from water to waste to people to cargo moves around.
Which is exactly what .FABRIC and James Corner Field Operations have done as part of their new show at the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam, which runs until August 23rd.
Find out more about their digital mapping of Rotterdam in our latest post
thisbigcity:

Google “cities as an organism” and you’ll find everything from TED talks to blog posts to academic papers on the topic. There’s no shortage of suggestions that collective actions in cities are like an urban metabolism.
The immense amount of data generated in cities can offer us an improved understanding of how everything from water to waste to people to cargo moves around.
Which is exactly what .FABRIC and James Corner Field Operations have done as part of their new show at the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam, which runs until August 23rd.
Find out more about their digital mapping of Rotterdam in our latest post

thisbigcity:

Google “cities as an organism” and you’ll find everything from TED talks to blog posts to academic papers on the topic. There’s no shortage of suggestions that collective actions in cities are like an urban metabolism.

The immense amount of data generated in cities can offer us an improved understanding of how everything from water to waste to people to cargo moves around.

Which is exactly what .FABRIC and James Corner Field Operations have done as part of their new show at the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam, which runs until August 23rd.

Find out more about their digital mapping of Rotterdam in our latest post

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:

FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate

The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):

  • Boston Government Service Center
  • 2 Columbus Circle, New York
  • EMP Museum, Seattle
  • Centre Point, London
  • Tour Montparnasse, Paris
  • Palau de les Arts, Valencia

What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 

Source:  , ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here
thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here
thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here
thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here
thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here

thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 

more here