thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here
thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here
thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here
thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here
thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here

thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 

more here

instagram:


Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia
To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.
Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.
Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.
instagram:


Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia
To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.
Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.
Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.
instagram:


Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia
To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.
Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.
Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.
instagram:


Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia
To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.
Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.
Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.
instagram:


Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia
To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.
Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.
Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.

instagram:

Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia

To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.

Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.

Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.

urbangeographies:

2014 FIFA WORLD CUP:  Brazilian attitudes and the “Curse of Maracanã”

Brazilian’s humiliating loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup, played in Rio’s then-new Maracanã Stadium, gave rise to what is sometimes called the “Curse of Maracanã.” Fans often unfairly blamed the national goalkeeper, Moacir Barbosa, for the devastating national defeat.

Christoph Niemann’s animated feature, “Curse of Maracanã,” interprets this episode — widely considered a traumatic event in the national psyche — in light of the current World Cup in Brazil. The admittedly unscientific sample of national opinion above, based on comments from Brazilian Facebook fans of The Times, illustrates how the current World Cup has become politicized in the country.

While Brazilians remain fanatic soccer fans, widespread protests over the last year have revealed broad opposition to the runaway government spending on the “FIFA-quality” stadiums and related infrastructures. Indeed, recent national opinion polls indicate that most Brazilians oppose the expenditures and presumed corruption associated with the construction projects. Protests have died down during the current competition, but opinions remain divided, as indicated above.

architizer:

Starchitecture gets remix’d. Read more. 
architizer:

What’s white, black, and has a table of contents? Apparently, every library — ever. Proof.
architizer:

What’s white, black, and has a table of contents? Apparently, every library — ever. Proof.

architizer:

What’s white, black, and has a table of contents? Apparently, every library — ever. Proof.

thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?
More in our latest post thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?
More in our latest post thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?
More in our latest post thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?
More in our latest post thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?
More in our latest post thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?
More in our latest post

thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?

More in our latest post

ryanpanos:

La Defense Offices | UN Studio | James Newton
ryanpanos:

La Defense Offices | UN Studio | James Newton
ryanpanos:

La Defense Offices | UN Studio | James Newton
ryanpanos:

La Defense Offices | UN Studio | James Newton
ryanpanos:

La Defense Offices | UN Studio | James Newton
ryanpanos:

La Defense Offices | UN Studio | James Newton
ryanpanos:

La Defense Offices | UN Studio | James Newton
typeworship:

Globe Jotter
These wonderful hand-painted globes are by Laura Maxcy, of Mississippi. Each vintage globe is drawn on directly using paint pens and then sprayed with a protective coating. 
As someone who’s not a fan of the pastiche quote posters that seem so ubiquitous, I love the connection between the sayings, the lettering and the globes. It’s this combination that gives the otherwise trite captions a twist of wit and whim.

“Although I got my degree in graphic design, I needed a creative outlet that didn’t involve staring at a computer screen all day. I started hand-lettering quotes on vintage landscape prints I found at a thrift store, with which I planned to decorate a room in my house. Instead I decided to list them on Etsy, along with my painted globes. Each of my items are definitely unique and one-of-a-kind.”



typeworship:

Globe Jotter
These wonderful hand-painted globes are by Laura Maxcy, of Mississippi. Each vintage globe is drawn on directly using paint pens and then sprayed with a protective coating. 
As someone who’s not a fan of the pastiche quote posters that seem so ubiquitous, I love the connection between the sayings, the lettering and the globes. It’s this combination that gives the otherwise trite captions a twist of wit and whim.

“Although I got my degree in graphic design, I needed a creative outlet that didn’t involve staring at a computer screen all day. I started hand-lettering quotes on vintage landscape prints I found at a thrift store, with which I planned to decorate a room in my house. Instead I decided to list them on Etsy, along with my painted globes. Each of my items are definitely unique and one-of-a-kind.”



typeworship:

Globe Jotter
These wonderful hand-painted globes are by Laura Maxcy, of Mississippi. Each vintage globe is drawn on directly using paint pens and then sprayed with a protective coating. 
As someone who’s not a fan of the pastiche quote posters that seem so ubiquitous, I love the connection between the sayings, the lettering and the globes. It’s this combination that gives the otherwise trite captions a twist of wit and whim.

“Although I got my degree in graphic design, I needed a creative outlet that didn’t involve staring at a computer screen all day. I started hand-lettering quotes on vintage landscape prints I found at a thrift store, with which I planned to decorate a room in my house. Instead I decided to list them on Etsy, along with my painted globes. Each of my items are definitely unique and one-of-a-kind.”



typeworship:

Globe Jotter
These wonderful hand-painted globes are by Laura Maxcy, of Mississippi. Each vintage globe is drawn on directly using paint pens and then sprayed with a protective coating. 
As someone who’s not a fan of the pastiche quote posters that seem so ubiquitous, I love the connection between the sayings, the lettering and the globes. It’s this combination that gives the otherwise trite captions a twist of wit and whim.

“Although I got my degree in graphic design, I needed a creative outlet that didn’t involve staring at a computer screen all day. I started hand-lettering quotes on vintage landscape prints I found at a thrift store, with which I planned to decorate a room in my house. Instead I decided to list them on Etsy, along with my painted globes. Each of my items are definitely unique and one-of-a-kind.”



typeworship:

Globe Jotter
These wonderful hand-painted globes are by Laura Maxcy, of Mississippi. Each vintage globe is drawn on directly using paint pens and then sprayed with a protective coating. 
As someone who’s not a fan of the pastiche quote posters that seem so ubiquitous, I love the connection between the sayings, the lettering and the globes. It’s this combination that gives the otherwise trite captions a twist of wit and whim.

“Although I got my degree in graphic design, I needed a creative outlet that didn’t involve staring at a computer screen all day. I started hand-lettering quotes on vintage landscape prints I found at a thrift store, with which I planned to decorate a room in my house. Instead I decided to list them on Etsy, along with my painted globes. Each of my items are definitely unique and one-of-a-kind.”



typeworship:

Globe Jotter
These wonderful hand-painted globes are by Laura Maxcy, of Mississippi. Each vintage globe is drawn on directly using paint pens and then sprayed with a protective coating. 
As someone who’s not a fan of the pastiche quote posters that seem so ubiquitous, I love the connection between the sayings, the lettering and the globes. It’s this combination that gives the otherwise trite captions a twist of wit and whim.

“Although I got my degree in graphic design, I needed a creative outlet that didn’t involve staring at a computer screen all day. I started hand-lettering quotes on vintage landscape prints I found at a thrift store, with which I planned to decorate a room in my house. Instead I decided to list them on Etsy, along with my painted globes. Each of my items are definitely unique and one-of-a-kind.”



typeworship:

Globe Jotter
These wonderful hand-painted globes are by Laura Maxcy, of Mississippi. Each vintage globe is drawn on directly using paint pens and then sprayed with a protective coating. 
As someone who’s not a fan of the pastiche quote posters that seem so ubiquitous, I love the connection between the sayings, the lettering and the globes. It’s this combination that gives the otherwise trite captions a twist of wit and whim.

“Although I got my degree in graphic design, I needed a creative outlet that didn’t involve staring at a computer screen all day. I started hand-lettering quotes on vintage landscape prints I found at a thrift store, with which I planned to decorate a room in my house. Instead I decided to list them on Etsy, along with my painted globes. Each of my items are definitely unique and one-of-a-kind.”



typeworship:

Globe Jotter
These wonderful hand-painted globes are by Laura Maxcy, of Mississippi. Each vintage globe is drawn on directly using paint pens and then sprayed with a protective coating. 
As someone who’s not a fan of the pastiche quote posters that seem so ubiquitous, I love the connection between the sayings, the lettering and the globes. It’s this combination that gives the otherwise trite captions a twist of wit and whim.

“Although I got my degree in graphic design, I needed a creative outlet that didn’t involve staring at a computer screen all day. I started hand-lettering quotes on vintage landscape prints I found at a thrift store, with which I planned to decorate a room in my house. Instead I decided to list them on Etsy, along with my painted globes. Each of my items are definitely unique and one-of-a-kind.”



typeworship:

Globe Jotter
These wonderful hand-painted globes are by Laura Maxcy, of Mississippi. Each vintage globe is drawn on directly using paint pens and then sprayed with a protective coating. 
As someone who’s not a fan of the pastiche quote posters that seem so ubiquitous, I love the connection between the sayings, the lettering and the globes. It’s this combination that gives the otherwise trite captions a twist of wit and whim.

“Although I got my degree in graphic design, I needed a creative outlet that didn’t involve staring at a computer screen all day. I started hand-lettering quotes on vintage landscape prints I found at a thrift store, with which I planned to decorate a room in my house. Instead I decided to list them on Etsy, along with my painted globes. Each of my items are definitely unique and one-of-a-kind.”



typeworship:

Globe Jotter
These wonderful hand-painted globes are by Laura Maxcy, of Mississippi. Each vintage globe is drawn on directly using paint pens and then sprayed with a protective coating. 
As someone who’s not a fan of the pastiche quote posters that seem so ubiquitous, I love the connection between the sayings, the lettering and the globes. It’s this combination that gives the otherwise trite captions a twist of wit and whim.

“Although I got my degree in graphic design, I needed a creative outlet that didn’t involve staring at a computer screen all day. I started hand-lettering quotes on vintage landscape prints I found at a thrift store, with which I planned to decorate a room in my house. Instead I decided to list them on Etsy, along with my painted globes. Each of my items are definitely unique and one-of-a-kind.”

typeworship:

Globe Jotter

These wonderful hand-painted globes are by Laura Maxcy, of Mississippi. Each vintage globe is drawn on directly using paint pens and then sprayed with a protective coating. 

As someone who’s not a fan of the pastiche quote posters that seem so ubiquitous, I love the connection between the sayings, the lettering and the globes. It’s this combination that gives the otherwise trite captions a twist of wit and whim.

“Although I got my degree in graphic design, I needed a creative outlet that didn’t involve staring at a computer screen all day. I started hand-lettering quotes on vintage landscape prints I found at a thrift store, with which I planned to decorate a room in my house. Instead I decided to list them on Etsy, along with my painted globes. Each of my items are definitely unique and one-of-a-kind.”

gasoline-station:

Urban Geometry - Tallinn (Iii) 
by Andrés Gallardo Albajar
gasoline-station:

Urban Geometry - Tallinn (Iii) 
by Andrés Gallardo Albajar
gasoline-station:

Urban Geometry - Tallinn (Iii) 
by Andrés Gallardo Albajar
gasoline-station:

Urban Geometry - Tallinn (Iii) 
by Andrés Gallardo Albajar
gasoline-station:

Urban Geometry - Tallinn (Iii) 
by Andrés Gallardo Albajar
gasoline-station:

Urban Geometry - Tallinn (Iii) 
by Andrés Gallardo Albajar
Colors:

Bold Geometric Compositions That Juxtapose Architectural Spaces Against The Sky
by Italian graphic designer Lino Russo
Colors:

Bold Geometric Compositions That Juxtapose Architectural Spaces Against The Sky
by Italian graphic designer Lino Russo
Colors:

Bold Geometric Compositions That Juxtapose Architectural Spaces Against The Sky
by Italian graphic designer Lino Russo
Colors:

Bold Geometric Compositions That Juxtapose Architectural Spaces Against The Sky
by Italian graphic designer Lino Russo
Colors:

Bold Geometric Compositions That Juxtapose Architectural Spaces Against The Sky
by Italian graphic designer Lino Russo
Colors:

Bold Geometric Compositions That Juxtapose Architectural Spaces Against The Sky
by Italian graphic designer Lino Russo
Colors:

Bold Geometric Compositions That Juxtapose Architectural Spaces Against The Sky
by Italian graphic designer Lino Russo
Colors:

Bold Geometric Compositions That Juxtapose Architectural Spaces Against The Sky
by Italian graphic designer Lino Russo
Colors:

Bold Geometric Compositions That Juxtapose Architectural Spaces Against The Sky
by Italian graphic designer Lino Russo
Colors:

Bold Geometric Compositions That Juxtapose Architectural Spaces Against The Sky
by Italian graphic designer Lino Russo

Colors:

Bold Geometric Compositions That Juxtapose Architectural Spaces Against The Sky

by Italian graphic designer Lino Russo

(via alexinsd)

gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
urbangeographies:

"I don’t want to be interesting. I want to be good."
Happy Birthday Ludwig Mies van der Rohe!
"Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), a German-born architect and educator, is widely acknowledged as one of the 20th century’s greatest architects. By emphasizing open space and revealing the industrial materials used in construction, he helped define modern architecture.
Our built environment is meant to be lived in. Mies’ buildings, beyond merely affecting our lives, endow them with greater significance and beauty. His buildings radiate the confidence, rationality, and elegance of their creator and, free of ornamentation and excess, confess the essential elements of our lives. In our time, where there is no limit to excess, Mies’ reductionist approach is as pertinent as ever. As we reduce the distractions and focus on the essential elements of our environment and ourselves, we find they are great, intricate, and beautiful. Less is more.” [via]
Photo credits found here 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
urbangeographies:

"I don’t want to be interesting. I want to be good."
Happy Birthday Ludwig Mies van der Rohe!
"Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), a German-born architect and educator, is widely acknowledged as one of the 20th century’s greatest architects. By emphasizing open space and revealing the industrial materials used in construction, he helped define modern architecture.
Our built environment is meant to be lived in. Mies’ buildings, beyond merely affecting our lives, endow them with greater significance and beauty. His buildings radiate the confidence, rationality, and elegance of their creator and, free of ornamentation and excess, confess the essential elements of our lives. In our time, where there is no limit to excess, Mies’ reductionist approach is as pertinent as ever. As we reduce the distractions and focus on the essential elements of our environment and ourselves, we find they are great, intricate, and beautiful. Less is more.” [via]
Photo credits found here 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
urbangeographies:

"I don’t want to be interesting. I want to be good."
Happy Birthday Ludwig Mies van der Rohe!
"Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), a German-born architect and educator, is widely acknowledged as one of the 20th century’s greatest architects. By emphasizing open space and revealing the industrial materials used in construction, he helped define modern architecture.
Our built environment is meant to be lived in. Mies’ buildings, beyond merely affecting our lives, endow them with greater significance and beauty. His buildings radiate the confidence, rationality, and elegance of their creator and, free of ornamentation and excess, confess the essential elements of our lives. In our time, where there is no limit to excess, Mies’ reductionist approach is as pertinent as ever. As we reduce the distractions and focus on the essential elements of our environment and ourselves, we find they are great, intricate, and beautiful. Less is more.” [via]
Photo credits found here 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
urbangeographies:

"I don’t want to be interesting. I want to be good."
Happy Birthday Ludwig Mies van der Rohe!
"Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), a German-born architect and educator, is widely acknowledged as one of the 20th century’s greatest architects. By emphasizing open space and revealing the industrial materials used in construction, he helped define modern architecture.
Our built environment is meant to be lived in. Mies’ buildings, beyond merely affecting our lives, endow them with greater significance and beauty. His buildings radiate the confidence, rationality, and elegance of their creator and, free of ornamentation and excess, confess the essential elements of our lives. In our time, where there is no limit to excess, Mies’ reductionist approach is as pertinent as ever. As we reduce the distractions and focus on the essential elements of our environment and ourselves, we find they are great, intricate, and beautiful. Less is more.” [via]
Photo credits found here 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
urbangeographies:

"I don’t want to be interesting. I want to be good."
Happy Birthday Ludwig Mies van der Rohe!
"Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), a German-born architect and educator, is widely acknowledged as one of the 20th century’s greatest architects. By emphasizing open space and revealing the industrial materials used in construction, he helped define modern architecture.
Our built environment is meant to be lived in. Mies’ buildings, beyond merely affecting our lives, endow them with greater significance and beauty. His buildings radiate the confidence, rationality, and elegance of their creator and, free of ornamentation and excess, confess the essential elements of our lives. In our time, where there is no limit to excess, Mies’ reductionist approach is as pertinent as ever. As we reduce the distractions and focus on the essential elements of our environment and ourselves, we find they are great, intricate, and beautiful. Less is more.” [via]
Photo credits found here 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
urbangeographies:

"I don’t want to be interesting. I want to be good."
Happy Birthday Ludwig Mies van der Rohe!
"Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), a German-born architect and educator, is widely acknowledged as one of the 20th century’s greatest architects. By emphasizing open space and revealing the industrial materials used in construction, he helped define modern architecture.
Our built environment is meant to be lived in. Mies’ buildings, beyond merely affecting our lives, endow them with greater significance and beauty. His buildings radiate the confidence, rationality, and elegance of their creator and, free of ornamentation and excess, confess the essential elements of our lives. In our time, where there is no limit to excess, Mies’ reductionist approach is as pertinent as ever. As we reduce the distractions and focus on the essential elements of our environment and ourselves, we find they are great, intricate, and beautiful. Less is more.” [via]
Photo credits found here 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

urbangeographies:

"I don’t want to be interesting. I want to be good."

Happy Birthday Ludwig Mies van der Rohe!

"Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), a German-born architect and educator, is widely acknowledged as one of the 20th century’s greatest architects. By emphasizing open space and revealing the industrial materials used in construction, he helped define modern architecture.

Our built environment is meant to be lived in. Mies’ buildings, beyond merely affecting our lives, endow them with greater significance and beauty. His buildings radiate the confidence, rationality, and elegance of their creator and, free of ornamentation and excess, confess the essential elements of our lives. In our time, where there is no limit to excess, Mies’ reductionist approach is as pertinent as ever. As we reduce the distractions and focus on the essential elements of our environment and ourselves, we find they are great, intricate, and beautiful. Less is more.” [via]

Photo credits found here 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

urbangeographies:


PRIVATELY OWNED PUBLIC SPACES IN BRAZIL:  Shopping Mall “Flash Mobs” or Rolezinhos
A novel social phenomenon recently began among adolescents in São Paulo and then spread to Rio de Janeiro, Brasília, and other cities. Mobilized by Facebook, YouTube, and other social media, ”flash mobs” or “rolezinhos” in Brazilian slang, often comprised several thousand teenagers, gather at shopping malls for social interaction on designated days. Organizers argue that the teenagers have nothing to do during the long, hot summer school vacations — the malls are attractive as safe, air-conditioned places to have snacks, hang out, and cruise for romance.
Mall managers, store owners, and many shoppers regard the large adolescent crowds as unruly and disruptive. Mall security and even police forces sometimes evict the groups, raising issues of access and equity. Mall officials have begun to monitor the social media to ascertain when mobilizations are planned. In some cases, the malls have closed on the days of planned “invasions,” such at the posh JK-Iguatemí shopping mall in Brasília’s Lago Norte district on Saturday, January 25.
Efforts to restrain these “flash mobs” have been criticized by some political leaders and groups in Brazil. Recent upward social mobility of poor families into the lower middle class has encouraged the teenagers to pursue social interaction on par with the upper middle classes. The malls’ rejection is perceived as perpetrated by a white, rich elite (managers and affluent shoppers) against the mostly disadvantaged teenagers of color. 
Accusations of social and racial discrimination have included those of the Municipal Secretary for Racial Promotion in São Paulo, Netinho de Paula (PCdoB-SP), an Afro-Brazilian leader. Indeed, organizers of the rolezinhos have been linked to the UJS-Union of Young Socialists — part of the Communist Party of Brazil (PCdoB) — and other political parties. 
Several mainstream parties have denied collaborating with the young organizers, and some youth leaders have rejected political affiliations. Organizer Vinicius Andrade recently met with the UJS, but later declared to the press: “I am not affiliated with any party or political entity. They were willing to help us in the disputes over rolezinhos, but I do not want to know about any political party. Our movement avoids partisan politics.”
Meanwhile, the controversies have gone to the courts. São Paulo Judge Romulo Russo recently approved the request of the shopping mall association ALSHOP and prohibited an upcoming rolezinho. Russo noted that it would be illegal to prohibit the right of people to come and go in the stores, but argued that the malls were unable to accommodate such large crowds and recommended that in São Paulo the events take place on “squares and public parks, the sambadrome, possibly in mall parking lots.”
Stay tuned for more updates on this controversy over the use of privately-owned public space in Brazil. For an interesting account in English, see the work of American journalist Vincent Bevins, who recently published an article on this phenomenon in the Los Angeles Times.
urbangeographies:


PRIVATELY OWNED PUBLIC SPACES IN BRAZIL:  Shopping Mall “Flash Mobs” or Rolezinhos
A novel social phenomenon recently began among adolescents in São Paulo and then spread to Rio de Janeiro, Brasília, and other cities. Mobilized by Facebook, YouTube, and other social media, ”flash mobs” or “rolezinhos” in Brazilian slang, often comprised several thousand teenagers, gather at shopping malls for social interaction on designated days. Organizers argue that the teenagers have nothing to do during the long, hot summer school vacations — the malls are attractive as safe, air-conditioned places to have snacks, hang out, and cruise for romance.
Mall managers, store owners, and many shoppers regard the large adolescent crowds as unruly and disruptive. Mall security and even police forces sometimes evict the groups, raising issues of access and equity. Mall officials have begun to monitor the social media to ascertain when mobilizations are planned. In some cases, the malls have closed on the days of planned “invasions,” such at the posh JK-Iguatemí shopping mall in Brasília’s Lago Norte district on Saturday, January 25.
Efforts to restrain these “flash mobs” have been criticized by some political leaders and groups in Brazil. Recent upward social mobility of poor families into the lower middle class has encouraged the teenagers to pursue social interaction on par with the upper middle classes. The malls’ rejection is perceived as perpetrated by a white, rich elite (managers and affluent shoppers) against the mostly disadvantaged teenagers of color. 
Accusations of social and racial discrimination have included those of the Municipal Secretary for Racial Promotion in São Paulo, Netinho de Paula (PCdoB-SP), an Afro-Brazilian leader. Indeed, organizers of the rolezinhos have been linked to the UJS-Union of Young Socialists — part of the Communist Party of Brazil (PCdoB) — and other political parties. 
Several mainstream parties have denied collaborating with the young organizers, and some youth leaders have rejected political affiliations. Organizer Vinicius Andrade recently met with the UJS, but later declared to the press: “I am not affiliated with any party or political entity. They were willing to help us in the disputes over rolezinhos, but I do not want to know about any political party. Our movement avoids partisan politics.”
Meanwhile, the controversies have gone to the courts. São Paulo Judge Romulo Russo recently approved the request of the shopping mall association ALSHOP and prohibited an upcoming rolezinho. Russo noted that it would be illegal to prohibit the right of people to come and go in the stores, but argued that the malls were unable to accommodate such large crowds and recommended that in São Paulo the events take place on “squares and public parks, the sambadrome, possibly in mall parking lots.”
Stay tuned for more updates on this controversy over the use of privately-owned public space in Brazil. For an interesting account in English, see the work of American journalist Vincent Bevins, who recently published an article on this phenomenon in the Los Angeles Times.
urbangeographies:


PRIVATELY OWNED PUBLIC SPACES IN BRAZIL:  Shopping Mall “Flash Mobs” or Rolezinhos
A novel social phenomenon recently began among adolescents in São Paulo and then spread to Rio de Janeiro, Brasília, and other cities. Mobilized by Facebook, YouTube, and other social media, ”flash mobs” or “rolezinhos” in Brazilian slang, often comprised several thousand teenagers, gather at shopping malls for social interaction on designated days. Organizers argue that the teenagers have nothing to do during the long, hot summer school vacations — the malls are attractive as safe, air-conditioned places to have snacks, hang out, and cruise for romance.
Mall managers, store owners, and many shoppers regard the large adolescent crowds as unruly and disruptive. Mall security and even police forces sometimes evict the groups, raising issues of access and equity. Mall officials have begun to monitor the social media to ascertain when mobilizations are planned. In some cases, the malls have closed on the days of planned “invasions,” such at the posh JK-Iguatemí shopping mall in Brasília’s Lago Norte district on Saturday, January 25.
Efforts to restrain these “flash mobs” have been criticized by some political leaders and groups in Brazil. Recent upward social mobility of poor families into the lower middle class has encouraged the teenagers to pursue social interaction on par with the upper middle classes. The malls’ rejection is perceived as perpetrated by a white, rich elite (managers and affluent shoppers) against the mostly disadvantaged teenagers of color. 
Accusations of social and racial discrimination have included those of the Municipal Secretary for Racial Promotion in São Paulo, Netinho de Paula (PCdoB-SP), an Afro-Brazilian leader. Indeed, organizers of the rolezinhos have been linked to the UJS-Union of Young Socialists — part of the Communist Party of Brazil (PCdoB) — and other political parties. 
Several mainstream parties have denied collaborating with the young organizers, and some youth leaders have rejected political affiliations. Organizer Vinicius Andrade recently met with the UJS, but later declared to the press: “I am not affiliated with any party or political entity. They were willing to help us in the disputes over rolezinhos, but I do not want to know about any political party. Our movement avoids partisan politics.”
Meanwhile, the controversies have gone to the courts. São Paulo Judge Romulo Russo recently approved the request of the shopping mall association ALSHOP and prohibited an upcoming rolezinho. Russo noted that it would be illegal to prohibit the right of people to come and go in the stores, but argued that the malls were unable to accommodate such large crowds and recommended that in São Paulo the events take place on “squares and public parks, the sambadrome, possibly in mall parking lots.”
Stay tuned for more updates on this controversy over the use of privately-owned public space in Brazil. For an interesting account in English, see the work of American journalist Vincent Bevins, who recently published an article on this phenomenon in the Los Angeles Times.
urbangeographies:


PRIVATELY OWNED PUBLIC SPACES IN BRAZIL:  Shopping Mall “Flash Mobs” or Rolezinhos
A novel social phenomenon recently began among adolescents in São Paulo and then spread to Rio de Janeiro, Brasília, and other cities. Mobilized by Facebook, YouTube, and other social media, ”flash mobs” or “rolezinhos” in Brazilian slang, often comprised several thousand teenagers, gather at shopping malls for social interaction on designated days. Organizers argue that the teenagers have nothing to do during the long, hot summer school vacations — the malls are attractive as safe, air-conditioned places to have snacks, hang out, and cruise for romance.
Mall managers, store owners, and many shoppers regard the large adolescent crowds as unruly and disruptive. Mall security and even police forces sometimes evict the groups, raising issues of access and equity. Mall officials have begun to monitor the social media to ascertain when mobilizations are planned. In some cases, the malls have closed on the days of planned “invasions,” such at the posh JK-Iguatemí shopping mall in Brasília’s Lago Norte district on Saturday, January 25.
Efforts to restrain these “flash mobs” have been criticized by some political leaders and groups in Brazil. Recent upward social mobility of poor families into the lower middle class has encouraged the teenagers to pursue social interaction on par with the upper middle classes. The malls’ rejection is perceived as perpetrated by a white, rich elite (managers and affluent shoppers) against the mostly disadvantaged teenagers of color. 
Accusations of social and racial discrimination have included those of the Municipal Secretary for Racial Promotion in São Paulo, Netinho de Paula (PCdoB-SP), an Afro-Brazilian leader. Indeed, organizers of the rolezinhos have been linked to the UJS-Union of Young Socialists — part of the Communist Party of Brazil (PCdoB) — and other political parties. 
Several mainstream parties have denied collaborating with the young organizers, and some youth leaders have rejected political affiliations. Organizer Vinicius Andrade recently met with the UJS, but later declared to the press: “I am not affiliated with any party or political entity. They were willing to help us in the disputes over rolezinhos, but I do not want to know about any political party. Our movement avoids partisan politics.”
Meanwhile, the controversies have gone to the courts. São Paulo Judge Romulo Russo recently approved the request of the shopping mall association ALSHOP and prohibited an upcoming rolezinho. Russo noted that it would be illegal to prohibit the right of people to come and go in the stores, but argued that the malls were unable to accommodate such large crowds and recommended that in São Paulo the events take place on “squares and public parks, the sambadrome, possibly in mall parking lots.”
Stay tuned for more updates on this controversy over the use of privately-owned public space in Brazil. For an interesting account in English, see the work of American journalist Vincent Bevins, who recently published an article on this phenomenon in the Los Angeles Times.

urbangeographies:

PRIVATELY OWNED PUBLIC SPACES IN BRAZIL:  Shopping Mall “Flash Mobs” or Rolezinhos

A novel social phenomenon recently began among adolescents in São Paulo and then spread to Rio de Janeiro, Brasília, and other cities. Mobilized by Facebook, YouTube, and other social media, ”flash mobs” or rolezinhos” in Brazilian slang, often comprised several thousand teenagers, gather at shopping malls for social interaction on designated days. Organizers argue that the teenagers have nothing to do during the long, hot summer school vacations — the malls are attractive as safe, air-conditioned places to have snacks, hang out, and cruise for romance.

Mall managers, store owners, and many shoppers regard the large adolescent crowds as unruly and disruptive. Mall security and even police forces sometimes evict the groups, raising issues of access and equity. Mall officials have begun to monitor the social media to ascertain when mobilizations are planned. In some cases, the malls have closed on the days of planned “invasions,” such at the posh JK-Iguatemí shopping mall in Brasília’s Lago Norte district on Saturday, January 25.

Efforts to restrain these “flash mobs” have been criticized by some political leaders and groups in Brazil. Recent upward social mobility of poor families into the lower middle class has encouraged the teenagers to pursue social interaction on par with the upper middle classes. The malls’ rejection is perceived as perpetrated by a white, rich elite (managers and affluent shoppers) against the mostly disadvantaged teenagers of color. 

Accusations of social and racial discrimination have included those of the Municipal Secretary for Racial Promotion in São Paulo, Netinho de Paula (PCdoB-SP), an Afro-Brazilian leader. Indeed, organizers of the rolezinhos have been linked to the UJS-Union of Young Socialists — part of the Communist Party of Brazil (PCdoB) — and other political parties.

Several mainstream parties have denied collaborating with the young organizers, and some youth leaders have rejected political affiliations. Organizer Vinicius Andrade recently met with the UJS, but later declared to the press: “I am not affiliated with any party or political entity. They were willing to help us in the disputes over rolezinhos, but I do not want to know about any political party. Our movement avoids partisan politics.”

Meanwhile, the controversies have gone to the courts. São Paulo Judge Romulo Russo recently approved the request of the shopping mall association ALSHOP and prohibited an upcoming rolezinho. Russo noted that it would be illegal to prohibit the right of people to come and go in the stores, but argued that the malls were unable to accommodate such large crowds and recommended that in São Paulo the events take place on “squares and public parks, the sambadrome, possibly in mall parking lots.”

Stay tuned for more updates on this controversy over the use of privately-owned public space in Brazil. For an interesting account in English, see the work of American journalist Vincent Bevins, who recently published an article on this phenomenon in the Los Angeles Times.

urbnist:

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