thisbigcity:

Bogota’s new bike hire scheme is expanding, and it’s just one of many measure working on creating a more cycle-friendly city, including new bike lanes and car-free plazas. 
We take a look in more detail in our latest post thisbigcity:

Bogota’s new bike hire scheme is expanding, and it’s just one of many measure working on creating a more cycle-friendly city, including new bike lanes and car-free plazas. 
We take a look in more detail in our latest post thisbigcity:

Bogota’s new bike hire scheme is expanding, and it’s just one of many measure working on creating a more cycle-friendly city, including new bike lanes and car-free plazas. 
We take a look in more detail in our latest post

thisbigcity:

Bogota’s new bike hire scheme is expanding, and it’s just one of many measure working on creating a more cycle-friendly city, including new bike lanes and car-free plazas. 

We take a look in more detail in our latest post

heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors

heart-without-art-is-just-he:

Watercolor skylines: London, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, New York, Toronto, San Francisco, Sydney, Chicago and Paris.

by ArtPause

Skyline watercolors

ClimateWorks is a San Francisco based foundation whose mission is to support public policies that prevent dangerous climate change and promote global prosperity. This infographic about wlkable neighborhoods is part of a document called Planning Cities for People, which was prepared for the Chinese government. The document, which contains 8 research-based recommendations that lead to prosperous, low-carbon urban areas, uses richly illustrated maps and diagrams to present examples of street-grids that promote walking, prioritize bicycle networks, create mixed-use neighborhoods and support high-quality transit.

(via humanscalecities)

urbangeographies:

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA:  Illuminated roadways show the contours of urbanization!

by Marc Khachfe on Flickr.

publicdesignfestival:

In the south of Funen island (Denmark), JDS, URBAN AGENCY and Creo arkitekter have just created the new Faaborg Harbour Bath and Blue Base. The open sea bathing area has four wooden bridges of different width and length where lo sunbathe, sit, relax and dive into the water. publicdesignfestival:

In the south of Funen island (Denmark), JDS, URBAN AGENCY and Creo arkitekter have just created the new Faaborg Harbour Bath and Blue Base. The open sea bathing area has four wooden bridges of different width and length where lo sunbathe, sit, relax and dive into the water. publicdesignfestival:

In the south of Funen island (Denmark), JDS, URBAN AGENCY and Creo arkitekter have just created the new Faaborg Harbour Bath and Blue Base. The open sea bathing area has four wooden bridges of different width and length where lo sunbathe, sit, relax and dive into the water.

publicdesignfestival:

In the south of Funen island (Denmark), JDS, URBAN AGENCY and Creo arkitekter have just created the new Faaborg Harbour Bath and Blue Base. The open sea bathing area has four wooden bridges of different width and length where lo sunbathe, sit, relax and dive into the water.

nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere nevver:

Art Everywhere

Art is everywhere
nevver:

Monet

Monet
thisbigcity:

Google “cities as an organism” and you’ll find everything from TED talks to blog posts to academic papers on the topic. There’s no shortage of suggestions that collective actions in cities are like an urban metabolism.
The immense amount of data generated in cities can offer us an improved understanding of how everything from water to waste to people to cargo moves around.
Which is exactly what .FABRIC and James Corner Field Operations have done as part of their new show at the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam, which runs until August 23rd.
Find out more about their digital mapping of Rotterdam in our latest post
thisbigcity:

Google “cities as an organism” and you’ll find everything from TED talks to blog posts to academic papers on the topic. There’s no shortage of suggestions that collective actions in cities are like an urban metabolism.
The immense amount of data generated in cities can offer us an improved understanding of how everything from water to waste to people to cargo moves around.
Which is exactly what .FABRIC and James Corner Field Operations have done as part of their new show at the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam, which runs until August 23rd.
Find out more about their digital mapping of Rotterdam in our latest post
thisbigcity:

Google “cities as an organism” and you’ll find everything from TED talks to blog posts to academic papers on the topic. There’s no shortage of suggestions that collective actions in cities are like an urban metabolism.
The immense amount of data generated in cities can offer us an improved understanding of how everything from water to waste to people to cargo moves around.
Which is exactly what .FABRIC and James Corner Field Operations have done as part of their new show at the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam, which runs until August 23rd.
Find out more about their digital mapping of Rotterdam in our latest post

thisbigcity:

Google “cities as an organism” and you’ll find everything from TED talks to blog posts to academic papers on the topic. There’s no shortage of suggestions that collective actions in cities are like an urban metabolism.

The immense amount of data generated in cities can offer us an improved understanding of how everything from water to waste to people to cargo moves around.

Which is exactly what .FABRIC and James Corner Field Operations have done as part of their new show at the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam, which runs until August 23rd.

Find out more about their digital mapping of Rotterdam in our latest post

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:


FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate
The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):
Boston Government Service Center
2 Columbus Circle, New York
EMP Museum, Seattle
Centre Point, London
Tour Montparnasse, Paris
Palau de les Arts, Valencia
What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 
Source:  Jason Farago, ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

urbangeographies:

FAILED ARCHITECTURE:  Buildings people love to hate

The FBI just announced it will move to a new facility, abandoning the hulking J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Speculation is that the old Hoover Building, much despised for its massive brutalism, will be demolished. Still, as Jason Farago noted recently in The Guardian, even “unsuccessful” buildings are part of urban history, and one pleasure of being a city-dweller is finding buildings that you can “love to hate.” Here are six other such ‘unsuccessful buildings’ on his list (pictured here):

  • Boston Government Service Center
  • 2 Columbus Circle, New York
  • EMP Museum, Seattle
  • Centre Point, London
  • Tour Montparnasse, Paris
  • Palau de les Arts, Valencia

What buildings do you intensely dislike? The old Pan Am Building — now rechristened the Met Life Building — looming behind Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan — has long been widely disliked in NYC. Back in the 1970s, New York Magazine listed it as the city’s most hated building. Another on that list was the old World Trade Center, whose twin towers also were reviled before 9/11 for their overwhelming, out-of-scale presence over Lower Manhattan. This last case reminds us that attitudes sometimes shift, particularly after a tragedy. 

Source:  , ”Architecture’s epic fails: Buildings we love to hate,” The Guardian, July 31, 2014

thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here
thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here
thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here
thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here
thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 
more here

thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 

more here

instagram:


Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia
To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.
Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.
Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.
instagram:


Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia
To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.
Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.
Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.
instagram:


Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia
To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.
Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.
Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.
instagram:


Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia
To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.
Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.
Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.
instagram:


Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia
To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.
Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.
Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.

instagram:

Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia

To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.

Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.

Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.

urbangeographies:

2014 FIFA WORLD CUP:  Brazilian attitudes and the “Curse of Maracanã”

Brazilian’s humiliating loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup, played in Rio’s then-new Maracanã Stadium, gave rise to what is sometimes called the “Curse of Maracanã.” Fans often unfairly blamed the national goalkeeper, Moacir Barbosa, for the devastating national defeat.

Christoph Niemann’s animated feature, “Curse of Maracanã,” interprets this episode — widely considered a traumatic event in the national psyche — in light of the current World Cup in Brazil. The admittedly unscientific sample of national opinion above, based on comments from Brazilian Facebook fans of The Times, illustrates how the current World Cup has become politicized in the country.

While Brazilians remain fanatic soccer fans, widespread protests over the last year have revealed broad opposition to the runaway government spending on the “FIFA-quality” stadiums and related infrastructures. Indeed, recent national opinion polls indicate that most Brazilians oppose the expenditures and presumed corruption associated with the construction projects. Protests have died down during the current competition, but opinions remain divided, as indicated above.

architizer:

Starchitecture gets remix’d. Read more. 
architizer:

What’s white, black, and has a table of contents? Apparently, every library — ever. Proof.
architizer:

What’s white, black, and has a table of contents? Apparently, every library — ever. Proof.

architizer:

What’s white, black, and has a table of contents? Apparently, every library — ever. Proof.

thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?
More in our latest post thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?
More in our latest post thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?
More in our latest post thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?
More in our latest post thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?
More in our latest post thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?
More in our latest post

thisbigcity:

Could Europe be redefined by a regional approach to renewable energy? Might this enable to continent to become energy self-sufficient, and in a sustainable manner?

More in our latest post